C.S. Lewis and the Calormenes: A Commentary on Narnia’s Arabesque Baddies

Stereotyping all things “other” has been something of a given in the history of humanity since the first concepts of tribal, religious, and territorial distinctions emerged. The East and West divide between Christians and Muslims is certainly no exception, hammered home by centuries of wars and rumors of wars, spurred on by the instinct to simplify the complexity of anything perceived to be a threat, … Continue reading C.S. Lewis and the Calormenes: A Commentary on Narnia’s Arabesque Baddies

Love Goes On and On: Growing Up with Disney’s “Robin Hood”

My first encounters with the legends of Robin Hood are, in many ways, the memory of my own maturing, realizing things for the first time which have characterized my understanding of the world around me. I suppose that this is the crux of a life-changing story; it crafts some aspect of your inner self, in a way that almost feels predestined. I first watched the … Continue reading Love Goes On and On: Growing Up with Disney’s “Robin Hood”

My Duty Forbids It: The Historical Context of Professor Snape

One of the first things that struck me about the character of Professor Severus Snape as portrayed by Alan Rickman in the Harry Potter film series was how in sync it tended to be with the militaristic teaching styles of real British boarding schools well into the second half of the 20th century. He made a perfect stereotypical black-cloaked, pale-faced, long-nosed schoolmaster, who did not … Continue reading My Duty Forbids It: The Historical Context of Professor Snape